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kmackay:

Nerding out with Modern Farmer magazine…thanks for the recommendation @misslindsaylootoo! #modernfarm #urbanag #verticaltheory #farmlife @modfarm

kmackay:

Nerding out with Modern Farmer magazine…thanks for the recommendation @misslindsaylootoo! #modernfarm #urbanag #verticaltheory #farmlife @modfarm

Inside An Old Chicago Packing Plant, Inspiring Proof That Urban Indoor Farming Can SucceedRead the full article on Fast.coExist. 

Inside An Old Chicago Packing Plant, Inspiring Proof That Urban Indoor Farming Can Succeed

Read the full article on Fast.coExist

This Giant Floating Farm Uses Melting Icebergs To Bring Local Food To GreenlandAs glaciers melt at record speeds due to climate change, some (often questionable) startups are beginning to harvest the melting freshwater, bottle it up, and ship it off to distant grocery store shelves. But then there are ideas like this one: Why not use the nutrient-rich water to help grow local food for Greenland, which currently ships in almost all of its produce from overseas?
French architecture students came up with the idea for Arctic Harvester, a floating hydroponic farm and village, while doing research for another project on Greenland. “We were struck by the idea that Greenland’s icebergs support such rich localized ecosystems…An iceberg is an oasis,” says Meriem Chabani, who worked on the concept along with Etienne Chobaux, John Edom, and Maeva Leneveu. “We had what seemed to us a massive resource on one hand, and a massive lack—no local produce—on the other.”
Read the full article here. 

This Giant Floating Farm Uses Melting Icebergs To Bring Local Food To Greenland

As glaciers melt at record speeds due to climate change, some (often questionable) startups are beginning to harvest the melting freshwater, bottle it up, and ship it off to distant grocery store shelves. But then there are ideas like this one: Why not use the nutrient-rich water to help grow local food for Greenland, which currently ships in almost all of its produce from overseas?

French architecture students came up with the idea for Arctic Harvester, a floating hydroponic farm and village, while doing research for another project on Greenland. “We were struck by the idea that Greenland’s icebergs support such rich localized ecosystems…An iceberg is an oasis,” says Meriem Chabani, who worked on the concept along with Etienne Chobaux, John Edom, and Maeva Leneveu. “We had what seemed to us a massive resource on one hand, and a massive lack—no local produce—on the other.”

Read the full article here. 

staceythinx:

Architect Vincent Callebaut’s take on vertical farming is as interesting to look at as it is beneficial.

About the project:

The cities are currently responsible for 75% of the worldwide consumption of energy and they reject 80% of worldwide emissions of CO2. The contemporary urban model is thus ultra-energy consuming and works on the importation of wealth and natural resources on the one hand, and on the exportation of the pollution and waste on the other hand. This loop of energetic flows can be avoided by repatriating the countryside and the farming production modes in the heart of the city by the creation of green lungs, farmscrapers in vertical storeys and by the implantation of wind and solar power stations. The production sites of food and energy resources will be thus reintegrated in the heart of the consumption sites ! The buildings with positive energies must become the norm and reduce the carbon print on the mid term.

Read more…

(Source: mymodernmet.com)

Please support New York Sun Works! I had the chance to work with this team and the work they are doing is so inspiring and important for young minds. Donate here. 

Please support New York Sun Works! I had the chance to work with this team and the work they are doing is so inspiring and important for young minds. Donate here. 

Hi Tumblr friends! I’m excited to be one of 5 finalists for Alternative Grants! Vote for my Sustainability Design & Technology project, “Vertical Theory”, to help me win. Please reblog and share with your friends. Thank you so much for your support! Just two days to go!
Vote here: http://grants.alternativeapparel.com/vote

Hi Tumblr friends! I’m excited to be one of 5 finalists for Alternative Grants! Vote for my Sustainability Design & Technology project, “Vertical Theory”, to help me win. Please reblog and share with your friends. Thank you so much for your support! Just two days to go!

Vote here: http://grants.alternativeapparel.com/vote

fastcompany:

These Kits Teach Kids That Food Has A History Beyond The Grocery Store

“If you ask a lot of kids here where food comes from, they say the grocery store,” says Zoe Burgess, who works with Jones Valley Teaching Farm, an urban farm in downtown Birmingham, Alabama. “Or they say Walmart or Public, which is a big chain in the South.”

Burgess sees this question, and the fact that food doesn’t actually sprout from store shelves, as a perfect opportunity to talk about the complexity of the food system.

The farm hosts programs for kids on-site, and they’ve also recently started visiting schools in Birmingham. Now, they’ve designed a new kit to bring along, which aims to teach kids about each step food takes from the field to a plate or compost bin.

Hi Tumblr friends! I’m excited to be one of 5 finalists for Alternative Grants! Vote for my Sustainability Design & Technology project, “Vertical Theory”, to help me win. Please reblog and share with your friends. Thank you so much for your support! Vote here: http://grants.alternativeapparel.com/vote

Hi Tumblr friends! I’m excited to be one of 5 finalists for Alternative Grants! Vote for my Sustainability Design & Technology project, “Vertical Theory”, to help me win. Please reblog and share with your friends. Thank you so much for your support! Vote here: http://grants.alternativeapparel.com/vote

kmackay:

Vertical Theory on display at McCoppin Hub today! #verticaltheory #activatemccoppin #mccoppinhub #alternativegrants #sustainability #sanfrancisco #design #technology (at Activate McCoppin)

Perfect SF day!

kmackay:

Vertical Theory on display at McCoppin Hub today! #verticaltheory #activatemccoppin #mccoppinhub #alternativegrants #sustainability #sanfrancisco #design #technology (at Activate McCoppin)

Perfect SF day!

theatlantic:

New At the Nursery: Tomato + Potato = TomTato

It’s a tomato plant! It’s a potato plant!
It’s Super—no, wait, it’s a tomato plant grafted onto a potato plant.
This summer, the British seed company Thompson and Morgan unveiled a new kind of plant: A TomTato™. It is, literally, a plant that grows both tomatoes and potatoes.
It’s made possible by good ol’ graft: A healthy tomato plant is grafted onto a healthy potato plant, and voila, the two become one. Both tomatoes and potatoes are nightshades, and, even more specifically, part of the genus Solanum. (Common eggplants are in that category, too, but Thomson and Morgan haven’t announced any plans to unleash an EggTato.)
Read more. [Image: Thompson & Morgan]

theatlantic:

New At the Nursery: Tomato + Potato = TomTato

It’s a tomato plant! It’s a potato plant!

It’s Super—no, wait, it’s a tomato plant grafted onto a potato plant.

This summer, the British seed company Thompson and Morgan unveiled a new kind of plant: A TomTato™. It is, literally, a plant that grows both tomatoes and potatoes.

It’s made possible by good ol’ graft: A healthy tomato plant is grafted onto a healthy potato plant, and voila, the two become one. Both tomatoes and potatoes are nightshades, and, even more specifically, part of the genus Solanum. (Common eggplants are in that category, too, but Thomson and Morgan haven’t announced any plans to unleash an EggTato.)

Read more. [Image: Thompson & Morgan]

kmackay:

Nerding out with Modern Farmer magazine…thanks for the recommendation @misslindsaylootoo! #modernfarm #urbanag #verticaltheory #farmlife @modfarm

kmackay:

Nerding out with Modern Farmer magazine…thanks for the recommendation @misslindsaylootoo! #modernfarm #urbanag #verticaltheory #farmlife @modfarm

Inside An Old Chicago Packing Plant, Inspiring Proof That Urban Indoor Farming Can SucceedRead the full article on Fast.coExist. 

Inside An Old Chicago Packing Plant, Inspiring Proof That Urban Indoor Farming Can Succeed

Read the full article on Fast.coExist

(Source: matthewmili)

This Giant Floating Farm Uses Melting Icebergs To Bring Local Food To GreenlandAs glaciers melt at record speeds due to climate change, some (often questionable) startups are beginning to harvest the melting freshwater, bottle it up, and ship it off to distant grocery store shelves. But then there are ideas like this one: Why not use the nutrient-rich water to help grow local food for Greenland, which currently ships in almost all of its produce from overseas?
French architecture students came up with the idea for Arctic Harvester, a floating hydroponic farm and village, while doing research for another project on Greenland. “We were struck by the idea that Greenland’s icebergs support such rich localized ecosystems…An iceberg is an oasis,” says Meriem Chabani, who worked on the concept along with Etienne Chobaux, John Edom, and Maeva Leneveu. “We had what seemed to us a massive resource on one hand, and a massive lack—no local produce—on the other.”
Read the full article here. 

This Giant Floating Farm Uses Melting Icebergs To Bring Local Food To Greenland

As glaciers melt at record speeds due to climate change, some (often questionable) startups are beginning to harvest the melting freshwater, bottle it up, and ship it off to distant grocery store shelves. But then there are ideas like this one: Why not use the nutrient-rich water to help grow local food for Greenland, which currently ships in almost all of its produce from overseas?

French architecture students came up with the idea for Arctic Harvester, a floating hydroponic farm and village, while doing research for another project on Greenland. “We were struck by the idea that Greenland’s icebergs support such rich localized ecosystems…An iceberg is an oasis,” says Meriem Chabani, who worked on the concept along with Etienne Chobaux, John Edom, and Maeva Leneveu. “We had what seemed to us a massive resource on one hand, and a massive lack—no local produce—on the other.”

Read the full article here. 

staceythinx:

Architect Vincent Callebaut’s take on vertical farming is as interesting to look at as it is beneficial.

About the project:

The cities are currently responsible for 75% of the worldwide consumption of energy and they reject 80% of worldwide emissions of CO2. The contemporary urban model is thus ultra-energy consuming and works on the importation of wealth and natural resources on the one hand, and on the exportation of the pollution and waste on the other hand. This loop of energetic flows can be avoided by repatriating the countryside and the farming production modes in the heart of the city by the creation of green lungs, farmscrapers in vertical storeys and by the implantation of wind and solar power stations. The production sites of food and energy resources will be thus reintegrated in the heart of the consumption sites ! The buildings with positive energies must become the norm and reduce the carbon print on the mid term.

Read more…

(Source: mymodernmet.com)

(Source: earthdaily, via farm-dreams)

Please support New York Sun Works! I had the chance to work with this team and the work they are doing is so inspiring and important for young minds. Donate here. 

Please support New York Sun Works! I had the chance to work with this team and the work they are doing is so inspiring and important for young minds. Donate here. 

Hi Tumblr friends! I’m excited to be one of 5 finalists for Alternative Grants! Vote for my Sustainability Design & Technology project, “Vertical Theory”, to help me win. Please reblog and share with your friends. Thank you so much for your support! Just two days to go!
Vote here: http://grants.alternativeapparel.com/vote

Hi Tumblr friends! I’m excited to be one of 5 finalists for Alternative Grants! Vote for my Sustainability Design & Technology project, “Vertical Theory”, to help me win. Please reblog and share with your friends. Thank you so much for your support! Just two days to go!

Vote here: http://grants.alternativeapparel.com/vote

fastcompany:

These Kits Teach Kids That Food Has A History Beyond The Grocery Store

“If you ask a lot of kids here where food comes from, they say the grocery store,” says Zoe Burgess, who works with Jones Valley Teaching Farm, an urban farm in downtown Birmingham, Alabama. “Or they say Walmart or Public, which is a big chain in the South.”

Burgess sees this question, and the fact that food doesn’t actually sprout from store shelves, as a perfect opportunity to talk about the complexity of the food system.

The farm hosts programs for kids on-site, and they’ve also recently started visiting schools in Birmingham. Now, they’ve designed a new kit to bring along, which aims to teach kids about each step food takes from the field to a plate or compost bin.

Hi Tumblr friends! I’m excited to be one of 5 finalists for Alternative Grants! Vote for my Sustainability Design & Technology project, “Vertical Theory”, to help me win. Please reblog and share with your friends. Thank you so much for your support! Vote here: http://grants.alternativeapparel.com/vote

Hi Tumblr friends! I’m excited to be one of 5 finalists for Alternative Grants! Vote for my Sustainability Design & Technology project, “Vertical Theory”, to help me win. Please reblog and share with your friends. Thank you so much for your support! Vote here: http://grants.alternativeapparel.com/vote

kmackay:

Vertical Theory on display at McCoppin Hub today! #verticaltheory #activatemccoppin #mccoppinhub #alternativegrants #sustainability #sanfrancisco #design #technology (at Activate McCoppin)

Perfect SF day!

kmackay:

Vertical Theory on display at McCoppin Hub today! #verticaltheory #activatemccoppin #mccoppinhub #alternativegrants #sustainability #sanfrancisco #design #technology (at Activate McCoppin)

Perfect SF day!

theatlantic:

New At the Nursery: Tomato + Potato = TomTato

It’s a tomato plant! It’s a potato plant!
It’s Super—no, wait, it’s a tomato plant grafted onto a potato plant.
This summer, the British seed company Thompson and Morgan unveiled a new kind of plant: A TomTato™. It is, literally, a plant that grows both tomatoes and potatoes.
It’s made possible by good ol’ graft: A healthy tomato plant is grafted onto a healthy potato plant, and voila, the two become one. Both tomatoes and potatoes are nightshades, and, even more specifically, part of the genus Solanum. (Common eggplants are in that category, too, but Thomson and Morgan haven’t announced any plans to unleash an EggTato.)
Read more. [Image: Thompson & Morgan]

theatlantic:

New At the Nursery: Tomato + Potato = TomTato

It’s a tomato plant! It’s a potato plant!

It’s Super—no, wait, it’s a tomato plant grafted onto a potato plant.

This summer, the British seed company Thompson and Morgan unveiled a new kind of plant: A TomTato™. It is, literally, a plant that grows both tomatoes and potatoes.

It’s made possible by good ol’ graft: A healthy tomato plant is grafted onto a healthy potato plant, and voila, the two become one. Both tomatoes and potatoes are nightshades, and, even more specifically, part of the genus Solanum. (Common eggplants are in that category, too, but Thomson and Morgan haven’t announced any plans to unleash an EggTato.)

Read more. [Image: Thompson & Morgan]

About:

A collection of infographics, research material, art and spontaneous thoughts related to urban agriculture, sustainability and the Vertical Theory project.:

Vertical Farms: A Sustainable Approach to Urban Agriculture To see all photos taken during the research, design and build phase of this project check out my flickr set.

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Abstract

The goal of this project is to design vertical farming systems to promote agriculture in urban environments. As the availability of food, water and energy resources becomes scarcer in an age of detrimental climate change, it will become paramount for food resources to be produced locally and for individuals, families and communities to become self-sufficient in regards to food, waste and energy. As oil prices increase, air quality declines and the global food supply diminishes, alternative methods of farming will be essential to urban living. Indoor vertical gardens and farms utilize minimal space compared to traditional farming, efficiently using space while simultaneously improving air quality, providing insulation to structures, and supplying fresh foods.

An ideal urban vertical farm system will address the food needs of individuals, families or small communities. Vertical farms can be either a collection of plants grown horizontally in a vertical system or a literally vertical vegetated wall surface. Rain collection systems that impart water directly to soil or plants will be tested in order to minimize consumption and maximize efficiency of water and energy use during the growing process. Plants will ideally rely on passive sunlight but other lighting options will also be explored. The system may also include elements to address home waste and grey water serving a dual function of food supply and waste filtration.

A verifiable and functional system could provide a long-term solution for individual users to increasing food prices and decreasing usable farmland. This project addresses larger global sustainability needs by creating a solution that is implemented on a small scale.

Keywords: Vertical Garden, Vertical Farm, Urban Garden, Urban Farm, Urban Agriculture, Industrial Agriculture, Rain Reclamation, Grey Water, LED, Hydroponic, Aeroponic, Green Wall

Problem Statement

Traditional farmlands are in a state of constant destruction and failure due to droughts, floods, pests and other detrimental elements created by global climate change. As the global population rapidly approaches 10 billion people there will no longer be sufficient farmland to supply food to all individuals. The United Nations reports that in 1970 there was one acre of farmland per person, this decreased to one-half acre in 2000 and is estimated to reach one-third acre by the year 2050. Seventy percent of globally available fresh water is currently used for irrigation, rendering it useless for drinking once contaminated by fertilizers, pesticides or one of the myriad of potentially hazardous chemicals used on industrial crops.

Urban farming addresses the ever increasing need of local and affordable foods by bringing food production to the individual, family or community. In recent years there has been a rise in demand for locally grown fruits and vegetables and an increase in urban farming programs including community gardens. Progress towards a new paradigm in agriculture is occurring but requires additional education, systems research and implementation. This project is intended to serve as an additional stepping stone in the process of shifting from large scale industrial agriculture to smaller-scale local urban farming. As farming moves from traditional farmlands to urban areas, farmlands that have been damaged by monoculture, harsh chemicals and overuse will be revitalized and returned to a more natural ecological state. In order to protect the diminishing available fresh water, rain water capture and recapture of water within the structure could be utilized for indoor farming systems. Additionally, vertical farms will reduce the production of greenhouse gas emission by limiting energy consumption for growing and shipping.

Urban vertical farms could be grown in the homes, at schools or in restaurants – offering fresh fruits and vegetables for immediate consumption and cooking. Modern life has led to a rampant increase in obesity and related health problems such as diabetes. Vertical farms could provide local, fresh, unprocessed foods to a larger under-served population such as those living in low-income communities. Fresh, organic foods are often costly and not accessible to these communities. Accessibility to full service grocery stores is often diminished in low-income communities forcing families to turn to low-quality processed foods offered in convenience stores and fast food restaurants.

Indoor vertical gardens will also provide improved air quality and serve as thermal barriers/insulators. Because indoor vertical farms will rely on passive sunlight they will be visible to both the inhabitants and the outside world, creating a beautification of urban environments. The perceived advantages of a vertically oriented system include an efficient use of space, gravity as a function of watering plants in a hydroponic system, and maximum accessibility to passive sunlight through windows (able to use entirety of window). Aesthetic qualities are also an important consideration. There is a perceived innate value in plant life that tends to provide an aspect of beauty, but the system itself can greatly diminish or accentuate that beauty depending on arrangement of components, materials used and technologies in place.